NY 41×41, Infinite Zoom Illusion Video of Manhattan’s Fifth Avenue

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In the short video “NY 41×41″ by Paul Trillo, the camera appears to zoom seamlessly down 41 blocks of Fifth Avenue in Manhattan. Trillo created the infinite zoom effect by first taking 41 photos along Fifth Avenue with a Nokia Lumia 1020 smartphone. The photos were then digitally stitched and blended into one seamless video (see the making-of video for more). Trillo created the video for Nokia.

videos via Nokia

Go behind the scenes of the movie secretly filmed at Disney parks

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Director Randy Moore was worried that his new psychological horror film, Escape from Tomorrow, might run into serious legal troubles with Disney for having been secretly shot within its theme parks without permission, but the movie managed to make it out to viewers over the weekend without trouble. Yet despite all the attention his film is receiving, Moore admits in a behind-the-scenes interview with Vice that the movie grew into something far bigger than he had initially intended. He had wanted to shoot the picture quickly with a few friends, but he says that it quickly “snowballed into this kind of gargantuan effort.” Though Moore may have been asking for trouble, he seems to have largely avoided it. There’s been no outcry from Disney, and even while shooting at the theme parks, Moore’s crew never had a major problem. “We were hiding in plain sight,” Roy Abramsohn, the film’s lead actor, tells Vice. “No one was looking for a movie shoot.” Because they didn’t bring in anything that obviously looked like filming gear and stuck to common cameras and hidden microphones, Disney’s security team never saw anything an ordinary park visitor might bring, even when checking through their bags.

In its behind-the-scenes look at the film, Vice also speaks with artists Paul McCarthy and Damon McCarthy and writer Jonathan Lethem about their thoughts on the film. Lethem calls Moore’s invasion of Disney’s parks a “very, very important and radical gesture.” Moore’s actual thoughts on Disney appear to be mixed, and not quite as negative as one might guess: he says that he has fond memories of the parks from childhood, but he’s now curious about the fanfare that surrounds them. “There’s no other place like it in America,” Moore says of the parks. “I just wanted to really explore that feeling people have and that mania … almost like they’re going off the cliff together.”

Anthony Hopkins says Bryan Cranston’s acting in ‘Breaking Bad’ is the best he’s ever seen

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Anthony Hopkins wasn’t a Breaking Bad fan until just a few weeks ago, but after a marathon session bringing him from episode one through the series’ conclusion, he’s become simply stunned by it. “Your performance as Walter White was the best acting I have seen — ever,” Hopkins allegedly writes in an email to Bryan Cranston, which was published yesterday by actor Steven Michael Quezada, who played Hank’s partner, Steven Gomez. “This work of yours is spectacular — absolutely stunning,” Hopkins writes.

The compliment should mean something coming from Hopkins, who is widely considered to be among the finest actors around. While Hopkins begins by commending Cranston alone, he continues to express his love of the entire series and its full cast. “What is extraordinary, is the sheer power of everyone in the entire production,” Hopkins writes. “It was like a great Jacobean, Shakespearian, or Greek Tragedy.” While the cast probably appreciated Hopkins letter, it only serves to underscore how disappointed fans may be to finally let it go. “That kind of work / artistry is rare,” Hopkins writes, “and when, once in a while, it occurs, as in this epic work, it restores confidence.”

Update: After receiving wider attention today, it appears that Quezada has pulled the Facebook post that he published the letter in. The full text of the letter — as recovered by commenter Mo.hit — is now quoted below.

Dear Mister Cranston.

I wanted to write you this email – so I am contacting you through Jeremy Barber – I take it we are both represented by UTA . Great agency.

I’ve just finished a marathon of watching “BREAKING BAD” – from episode one of the First Season – to the last eight episodes of the Sixth Season. (I downloaded the last season on AMAZON) A total of two weeks (addictive) viewing.

I have never watched anything like it. Brilliant!

Your performance as Walter White was the best acting I have seen – ever.

I know there is so much smoke blowing and sickening bullshit in this business, and I’ve sort of lost belief in anything really.

But this work of yours is spectacular – absolutely stunning. What is extraordinary, is the sheer power of everyone in the entire production. What was it? Five or six years in the making? How the producers (yourself being one of them), the writers, directors, cinematographers…. every department – casting etc. managed to keep the discipline and control from beginning to the end is (that over used word) awesome.

From what started as a black comedy, descended into a labyrinth of blood, destruction and hell. It was like a great Jacobean, Shakespearian or Greek Tragedy.

If you ever get a chance to – would you pass on my admiration to everyone – Anna Gunn, Dean Norris, Aaron Paul, Betsy Brandt, R.J. Mitte, Bob Odenkirk, Jonathan Banks, Steven Michael Quezada – everyone – everyone gave master classes of performance … The list is endless.

Thank you. That kind of work/artistry is rare, and when, once in a while, it occurs, as in this epic work, it restores confidence.

You and all the cast are the best actors I’ve ever seen.

That may sound like a good lung full of smoke blowing. But it is not. It’s almost midnight out here in Malibu, and I felt compelled to write this email.

Congratulations and my deepest respect. You are truly a great, great actor.

Best regards

Tony Hopkins.

Nike Tech Fleece by Jonathan Kim

Nike Tech Fleece is an innovative new line of sportswear that merges lightweight fabric with polyester spacers. This allows heat to be trapped, creating warmth without the extra weight. A handful of designers and I researched the process of the garment being made as well as the technology involved in handling this unique fabric. To control the intricate build of the strands I had the pleasure of leading a team of superstar 3d artists to build the entire garment using cloth simulations. We wanted to make sure the machine building this fabric was just as unique as the product. We referenced our favorite sci-fi films as well as modern architects to design a one-of-a-kind Nike loom to generate the build of our hero hoodie.

47141e0acd9e231a83b466d2a934de4a 109d695e3720448adec36e12f57cc681 05fa6181aa0e150036c1bf906bd95cb9 5ab48b0f6d502b5ae1173c2bafb4c1b8 5a474e475846cc93189b70f6ad8d70ab f8d44790bd9e1959ebe356667999620f f8ae48755db23ccee97abaa7c1a2c371 111216eae9841f767857b3ef21c4c527 0a445a06ad15f54f9e6efa1a30abb5a6 abb96bb3d5ec786bdae070875dbab1b4 3e7accfa4033e807da8faad589a5f64e

 

Link on Behance

‘Jurassic Park 4’ becomes ‘Jurassic World,’ coming summer 2015

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Following months of speculation, Deadline Hollywood reports that the movie formerly known as Jurassic Park 4 is moving ahead, it’s just coming to theaters a year later thanpreviously announced. The newly renamed Jurassic World is now set for a June 12th, 2015 release, with director and co-writer Colin Trevorrow (Safety Not Guaranteed) and executive producer Steven Spielberg bringing the project to life. It’s too bad that the film’s dinosaurs won’t be sporting scientifically accurate plumage, but we’re sure they’ll still look great in 3D.

Escape from tomorrow trailer – movie filmed secretly at Disney world

Though it premiered at Sundance earlier this year, it seemed unlikely that those who missed the festival would ever get to see Escape From Tomorrow, Randy Moore’s surrealistic neo-noir film about a family coming apart while on vacation. That’s because the director’s debut employed a particularly bold—and possibly illegal—approach to on-location shooting: Moore, along with his cast and crew filmed it at Disney theme parks in Anaheim, Calif. and Orlando, Fla. without permission.

Here’s how it all went down, as I explained in a previous Brow Beat post back in January:

Moore and a small group of actors and crew went undercover as tourists for just under a month in order to film the movie. Scripts and all shooting directions were kept on their iPhones so that “when actors and crew were looking down between takes, passersby just thought they were glancing at their messages.” The actors wore the same clothes every day, but park employees seemed unsuspecting—perhaps, Moore has noted, because there are so many people who come and go through the park every day, taking pictures and recording home movies constantly.

At the time of its Sundance premiere, Disney had yet to release a statement on Escape From Tomorrow, and it seems to have stayed mum since then, at least publicly. But the film has a theatrical and video-on-demand release date of Oct. 11, and the official trailer is here to unsettle you.

Featuring a sharp disclosure at the beginning (“The following picture has NOT been approved for all audiences by The Walt Disney Company”), the black and white trailer emphasizes its disturbing take on the wide world of Disney. A young boy’s eyes turn creepily black, the cheerful imagery of the “It’s a Small World” ride is juxtaposed with the line “You can’t be happy all the time,” and Epcot Center appears to roll into a panicked crowd—all scored to Zbigniew Preisner’s haunting compositions for Krzysztof Kieslowski’sBlue.

How has Moore been able to get away with this? Disney may have had a case against Moore if he and his crew violated any of the theme park’s regulations through their covert actions, but the company likely thought it was in its best interest not to draw more attention to the film by taking legal action. (They remained similarly tight-lipped on the 2010 documentary Exit Through the Gift Shop, which also filmed at Disneyland sanspermission.) What’s more, Escape From Tomorrow is likely an example of “fair use,”employing the theme parks as a means of commenting upon them in a creative way.

Whatever the case, the great trailer makes me excited to see Disney World in an entirely new, and much more sinister, light.

‘Mirror’s Edge’ parkour recreated in unbelievable real-life video

EA announced a next-gen sequel to parkour-influenced cult hit Mirror’s Edge at this year’s E3 conference, but didn’t show off much of the actual game. If you’re feeling optimistic, though, you might dare to hope that it’ll turn out something like this stunning video recorded from the perspective of UK parkour practitioner Neil Cointet.

Inspired by the original Mirror’s Edge, Cointet donned the garb of protagonist Faith and took to the rooftops of Cambridge for a head-spinning, death-defying two and a half minutes. After you’ve caught your breath, watch the video game’s debut trailer below to see just how uncanny Cointet’s recreation is.